phishing

Wide Impact: Highly Effective Gmail Phishing Technique Being Exploited

Do you use Gmail? A lot of people do. There is a phishing scam that is going around and it is fooling people who should know better, it’s that sophisticated. The usual advice to never click on links from people that look strange applies, but if you want to see right now if your account is signed in elsewhere, look to the bottom right hand side of your gmail page and look for details. Click on it to open another window.

It shows who is signed in. Remember that if you have it on your phone, you may have sign in from more than one location. However, if you don’t you can disconnect them immediately and change your password. Read this article on how it works and all that is compromised. It’s always best practice to change your passwords every few months, and never have your bank passwords the same as your email passwords.

The link below is the full article from Wordfence, a plugin that I use on all my WordPress sites to secure my client’s websites.

A new phishing technique that affects GMail and other services and how to protect yourself.

Source: Wide Impact: Highly Effective Gmail Phishing Technique Being Exploited

Spear Phishing

First you had Spear Phishing - image by Kevin FrankPhat, then you had Phishing and now Spear Phishing.

Spear Phishing is an email fraud attempt that uses information in a targeted way to trick you into giving them money or trade secrets.

It is important that you know how much about yourself is on the web. This type of fraud usually happens when someone claims to know you through some social event, when they have really only read about it on your Facebook page or other social site.

This type of phishing can also happen when a person emails the victim claiming to be from their own company and wanting log in details.  They can only do this by learning about specific details of your company and who you may answer to.  So if you think that this information is readily found on the internet, be careful who you give out information to.  It could be a phishing scam.

For the definitions of all things web, go to Webopedia.

 

 

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